artist statement

My creative process evolves in revolutions often revisiting familiar ideas or processes but with a new understanding and appreciation for them.  I have always been curious about the environments around me and since childhood on explored my surroundings through extensive bike rides, hiking adventures, and inquiry leading to discovery.  My current work uses the hand building techniques of coiling, slab construction, hand sculpting, and press molding.  Technical challenges included finding a clay body that objects could be directly fired into.  A low fire white paper clay body terra blanc was developed for this body of work and enabled me to even add onto bone dry pieces with wet clay. I’ve also done extensive research on a variety of display methods in order to select the best method of display for each piece. When exploring museums of any kind I find myself lost in thought, imagining the world that these artifacts, specimens, or fossils existed in and curious of the authenticity of interpretation through categorizing collections.  My work is a pseudoscientific investigation of artifacts, specimens, and fossils from 21st century American culture.  I’m interested in how these articles may be found, interpreted, or valued in the future and what histories or narratives they might tell.

Teaching philosophy

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.  This parable by Aesop is comparable to the act of teaching because no act of teaching, no matter how small, is ever wasted.  Anyone who takes the time to ask a question is worthy of an answer.  I don’t remember the moment that I decided to be a teacher; I just remember always being one, from leading 4-H projects when I was a kid to teaching ceramics at the college level.  Everyone has something to contribute to the world; they just need someone to nurture their creative spark and the opportunity to have a voice.  Art can break through the greatest of communication barriers.  I strive to teach and make art with an even higher level of dedication, empathy, and passion than my mentors.  “Whatever you do with your life, do it with gusto and passion.”  This is a philosophy that my undergraduate professor instilled in me and that I strive to instill in my own students.  Actions speak louder than words and as a teacher it is important to remember that you are a role model for your students and communities.


Teaching is a creative process and I tailor my teaching to meet the needs of each student, help them achieve their goals, and be the best that they can possibly be.  Teaching is a team effort and I often learn and gain fresh perspectives from my students.  My classroom is a supportive and safe learning environment that fosters inspiration, creativity, and self-confidence. 

I believe in Interdisciplinary research among the arts and that there is no hierarchy among media but a simple question of choosing which medium is best for the creative process at hand. In my classes students learn how to set specific, measureable goals, develop skill, concept, artistic voice, problem solving, and think critically about their own work and others. Students are also expected to participate in group discussion, critiques, and projects. These activities help students develop important social life skills such as being able to conversationally express their own artistic style with a personalized visual and verbal vocabulary. I make a point to take my students on field trips, whether it’s to the library for research, a local art workshop, museum, or national conference for clay because real world application and activities are an important part of the learning process. Field trips depend on the resources at hand but through creative problem solving, new opportunities, and solutions can be invented. When I teach, students are my number one priority, and I will stop my day at any point in order to help a student in need.  

Being a teacher is such a privilege and opportunity that I am grateful for every day.No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.  This parable by Aesop is comparable to the act of teaching because no act of teaching, no matter how small, is ever wasted.  Anyone who takes the time to ask a question is worthy of an answer.  I don’t remember the moment that I decided to be a teacher; I just remember always being one, from leading 4-H projects when I was a kid to teaching ceramics at the college level.  Everyone has something to contribute to the world; they just need someone to nurture their creative spark and the opportunity to have a voice.  Art can break through the greatest of communication barriers.  I strive to teach and make art with an even higher level of dedication, empathy, and passion than my mentors.  “Whatever you do with your life, do it with gusto and passion.”  This is a philosophy that my undergraduate professor instilled in me and that I strive to instill in my own students.  Actions speak louder than words and as a teacher it is important to remember that you are a role model for your students and communities. 

Teaching is a creative process and I tailor my teaching to meet the needs of each student, help them achieve their goals, and be the best that they can possibly be.  Teaching is a team effort and I often learn and gain fresh perspectives from my students.  My classroom is a supportive and safe learning environment that fosters inspiration, creativity, and self-confidence. 

I believe in Interdisciplinary research among the arts and that there is no hierarchy among media but a simple question of choosing which medium is best for the creative process at hand. In my classes students learn how to set specific, measureable goals, develop skill, concept, artistic voice, problem solving, and think critically about their own work and others. Students are also expected to participate in group discussion, critiques, and projects. These activities help students develop important social life skills such as being able to conversationally express their own artistic style with a personalized visual and verbal vocabulary. I make a point to take my students on field trips, whether it’s to the library for research, a local art workshop, museum, or national conference for clay because real world application and activities are an important part of the learning process. Field trips depend on the resources at hand but through creative problem solving, new opportunities, and solutions can be invented. When I teach, students are my number one priority, and I will stop my day at any point in order to help a student in need.  

Being a teacher is such a privilege and opportunity that I am grateful for every day.

aRTIST AND EDUCATOR